the-seed-of-europe:

A collage of romantic kitsch postcards that illustrated Magnus Hirschfeld’s Sexual History of the World War.

the-seed-of-europe:

A collage of romantic kitsch postcards that illustrated Magnus Hirschfeld’s Sexual History of the World War.

Brothels for Austrian and German troops on the front. (Source.)

A mobile brothel - or, as it was advertised, a “Mobile Field-Pleasure House for Officers.”

A mobile brothel - or, as it was advertised, a “Mobile Field-Pleasure House for Officers.”

Soldiers’ drawings found in German trenches. (Source.)

Reproduction of a price list poster from a military brothel near Lodz.
Price List
A. Drinks
Champagne per bottle : 18 marks
Bordeaux Ch. Lafitte : 6 marks
Hungarian wine : 8 marks
Beer (large stein) : 1.50 marks
Coffee per cup : 1 mark
Coffee small pot : 6 marks
Coffee large pot : 12 marks
Tea per glas : 0.60 marks
Seltzer water per bottle : 0.30 marks

B. Time with the Ladies
All night : 30 marks
For 2 to 3 hours in the evening : 20 marks
For 1 hour in the evening : 10 marks
For any period of time between 9 a.m. till 6 p.m. : 10 marks
(signed) The Morals police

Reproduction of a price list poster from a military brothel near Lodz.

Price List

A. Drinks

Champagne per bottle : 18 marks

Bordeaux Ch. Lafitte : 6 marks

Hungarian wine : 8 marks

Beer (large stein) : 1.50 marks

Coffee per cup : 1 mark

Coffee small pot : 6 marks

Coffee large pot : 12 marks

Tea per glas : 0.60 marks

Seltzer water per bottle : 0.30 marks

B. Time with the Ladies

All night : 30 marks

For 2 to 3 hours in the evening : 20 marks

For 1 hour in the evening : 10 marks

For any period of time between 9 a.m. till 6 p.m. : 10 marks

(signed) The Morals police

Ernst Friedrich was a dedicated anti-miltarist. He was jailed for refusing military service in Germany during the Great War and joined a number of revolutionary groups and movements. He opened an ‘Anti-War Museum’ which featured all manners of photographs and documents illustrating the horrors of war. In 1924 he published a two volume book ‘Kriege dem Krieg’ (War Against War) which used part of his large collection of photographs of dead, mutilated, wounded, executed and ill soldiers. Also included were a number of photographs taken in (military) brothels. This was meant to portray the debasement of soldiers who allowed themselves the ‘pleasures’ available in such establishments.

Ernst Friedrich was a dedicated anti-miltarist. He was jailed for refusing military service in Germany during the Great War and joined a number of revolutionary groups and movements. He opened an ‘Anti-War Museum’ which featured all manners of photographs and documents illustrating the horrors of war. In 1924 he published a two volume book ‘Kriege dem Krieg’ (War Against War) which used part of his large collection of photographs of dead, mutilated, wounded, executed and ill soldiers. Also included were a number of photographs taken in (military) brothels. This was meant to portray the debasement of soldiers who allowed themselves the ‘pleasures’ available in such establishments.

Sex and the Somme: The officially sanctioned brothels on the front line laid bare for the first time.
By Clare Makepeace.
When Corporal Jack Wood was given a few hours of leave from waging war on the Western Front, he probably never imagined that he was about to shed yet more of his innocence.
He had only recently arrived in France, but already had witnessed the travesty of friendly fire and been exposed to enemy shelling. He had waded through the mud of the trenches, felt lice crawl across his body and rats scuttle over him as he slept, exhausted, on the Front.
Yet, as he strolled through the streets of a nearby town, there was another shock awaiting him: a brothel. Wood wrote in his diary of how ‘we had heard of the renowned Red Lamp with a big No 3 on it, but never thought of the reality of the thing. My first view, I shall never forget.
‘There was a great crowd of fellows, four or five deep and about 30 yards in length, waiting just like a crowd waiting for a football cup tie in Blighty. 
'It was half an hour before opening time, so we had to see the opening ceremony. 
'At about five minutes to six,  the lamp was lit. To the minute, at six the door was opened. Then commenced the crush to get in.’
Read the rest of the article at the Daily Mail.
Illustration: Upper Floor Business by Heinrich Ziller.

Sex and the Somme: The officially sanctioned brothels on the front line laid bare for the first time.

By Clare Makepeace.

When Corporal Jack Wood was given a few hours of leave from waging war on the Western Front, he probably never imagined that he was about to shed yet more of his innocence.

He had only recently arrived in France, but already had witnessed the travesty of friendly fire and been exposed to enemy shelling. He had waded through the mud of the trenches, felt lice crawl across his body and rats scuttle over him as he slept, exhausted, on the Front.

Yet, as he strolled through the streets of a nearby town, there was another shock awaiting him: a brothel. Wood wrote in his diary of how ‘we had heard of the renowned Red Lamp with a big No 3 on it, but never thought of the reality of the thing. My first view, I shall never forget.

‘There was a great crowd of fellows, four or five deep and about 30 yards in length, waiting just like a crowd waiting for a football cup tie in Blighty. 

'It was half an hour before opening time, so we had to see the opening ceremony. 

'At about five minutes to six,  the lamp was lit. To the minute, at six the door was opened. Then commenced the crush to get in.’

Read the rest of the article at the Daily Mail.

Illustration: Upper Floor Business by Heinrich Ziller.


A collection of covers of erotic novels intended for soldiers and an advertizement that recommended them in the following fashion:

"What do our soldiers at the Front need as entertainment ? …

 ”Amusing and honest to goodness French, Gallic books ! And so dear soldier, here is something of good cheer and laughter! To help you pass some light-hearted moments, ‘La Librarie des Romans choisis’ is publishing its Collection Gauloise of which the magnificent and carefully illustrated editions will be published twice monthly at the unbelievable price of 60 centimes. May your parents and friends, so concerned about your moral well-being as well as about your physical health, bring you a few moments of sweet and healthy comedy by sending you as soon as possible several of the following titles. “

(Source.)

the-seed-of-europe:

Cover of The Lesbians of Berlin with foreword by Magnus Hirschfeld, 1928.

the-seed-of-europe:

Cover of The Lesbians of Berlin with foreword by Magnus Hirschfeld, 1928.

Tauentzien girls (lower class of prostitutes), Berlin 1920s.
Berlin in the 1920s had a very interesting and confusing legal stance on prostitution. Left-over laws from the reign of Friederich II did not allow for legally sanctioned brothel quarters within city limits, and yet individual female and male prostitution was to be carried out “under government surveillance” - in essence, it was permitted on a technicality despite being officially unlawful. “Whoring was, through the Wilhelmian era, alternately tolerated, then banned, then yet again ‘placed under surveillance.’ No matter what was decreed, however, prostitutes  and the citizenry who engaged their services always found ingenious ways to circumvent the murky codes. Only two sanctions were consistent: 1. Berlin refused to allot a legal district for the practice of harlotry - the ‘Mediterranean’ solution, and 2. public solicitation for sex was strictly prohibited" (Gordon, Voluptuous Panic). 
So, in essence a prostitute could ply his or her trade anywhere in the city as long as he or she did not verbally reveal her profession. Hence, an elaborate cosmopolitan code of dress and gesture developed in the Berlin demimonde through which sellers advertised their wares to buyers: “Customers could recognize the compliant goods instantly by their characteristic packaging. In other words, whores would promote themselves by looking like whores" (Gordon, Voluptuous Panic). A fascinating paradox, because of course looking that way made your trade obvious to law enforcement officials and yet they there was little they could do about it.
However, “the problem, unfortunately, became acute in the Weimar period when prostitute fashion was widely imitated by Berlin’s most virtuous females. For instance, one historical badge of shame for Stricht-violators, short-cropped hair, became the common emblem of the Tauentziengirl (above) at least for a year or two. Then in 1923, the short pageboy coif, or Bubikopf, achieved universal popularity as the stylish cut for trendy Berlinerinnen. Prostitutes had to change and update their provocative attire constantly in order to retain a legal means of solicitation" (Gordon, Voluptuous Panic).

Tauentzien girls (lower class of prostitutes), Berlin 1920s.

Berlin in the 1920s had a very interesting and confusing legal stance on prostitution. Left-over laws from the reign of Friederich II did not allow for legally sanctioned brothel quarters within city limits, and yet individual female and male prostitution was to be carried out “under government surveillance” - in essence, it was permitted on a technicality despite being officially unlawful. “Whoring was, through the Wilhelmian era, alternately tolerated, then banned, then yet again ‘placed under surveillance.’ No matter what was decreed, however, prostitutes  and the citizenry who engaged their services always found ingenious ways to circumvent the murky codes. Only two sanctions were consistent: 1. Berlin refused to allot a legal district for the practice of harlotry - the ‘Mediterranean’ solution, and 2. public solicitation for sex was strictly prohibited" (Gordon, Voluptuous Panic). 

So, in essence a prostitute could ply his or her trade anywhere in the city as long as he or she did not verbally reveal her profession. Hence, an elaborate cosmopolitan code of dress and gesture developed in the Berlin demimonde through which sellers advertised their wares to buyers: “Customers could recognize the compliant goods instantly by their characteristic packaging. In other words, whores would promote themselves by looking like whores" (Gordon, Voluptuous Panic). A fascinating paradox, because of course looking that way made your trade obvious to law enforcement officials and yet they there was little they could do about it.

However, “the problem, unfortunately, became acute in the Weimar period when prostitute fashion was widely imitated by Berlin’s most virtuous females. For instance, one historical badge of shame for Stricht-violators, short-cropped hair, became the common emblem of the Tauentziengirl (above) at least for a year or two. Then in 1923, the short pageboy coif, or Bubikopf, achieved universal popularity as the stylish cut for trendy Berlinerinnen. Prostitutes had to change and update their provocative attire constantly in order to retain a legal means of solicitation" (Gordon, Voluptuous Panic).