Photographs of Jewish ghettos in Nazi-occupied Poland taken by Hitler’s personal photographer, Hugo Jaeger. Town of Kutno, ca. 1939-1940. (Source.)

"Over 400,000 Polish Jews were forced to live in the Warsaw Ghetto from 1940 until 1943, an area of just 1.3 square miles. Starvation and disease killed an estimated 100,000, and many thousands more were shipped to concentration camps - mainly Treblinka - from within the Ghetto.During an uprising from January to April 1943, at least 50,000 were killed, and this was followed by the total destruction of the Ghetto by the Germans. This photograph shows all that was left.”

"Over 400,000 Polish Jews were forced to live in the Warsaw Ghetto from 1940 until 1943, an area of just 1.3 square miles. Starvation and disease killed an estimated 100,000, and many thousands more were shipped to concentration camps - mainly Treblinka - from within the Ghetto.

During an uprising from January to April 1943, at least 50,000 were killed, and this was followed by the total destruction of the Ghetto by the Germans. This photograph shows all that was left.”

"German soldiers question Jews after the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising in 1943. In October 1940, the Germans began to concentrate Poland’s population of over 3 million Jews into overcrowded ghettos. In the largest of these, the Warsaw Ghetto, thousands of Jews died due to rampant disease and starvation, even before the Nazis began their massive deportations from the ghetto to the Treblinka extermination camp. The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising — the first urban mass rebellion against the Nazi occupation of Europe — took place from April 19 until May 16 1943, and began after German troops and police entered the ghetto to deport its surviving inhabitants. It ended when the poorly-armed and supplied resistance was crushed by German troops."

"German soldiers question Jews after the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising in 1943. In October 1940, the Germans began to concentrate Poland’s population of over 3 million Jews into overcrowded ghettos. In the largest of these, the Warsaw Ghetto, thousands of Jews died due to rampant disease and starvation, even before the Nazis began their massive deportations from the ghetto to the Treblinka extermination camp. The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising — the first urban mass rebellion against the Nazi occupation of Europe — took place from April 19 until May 16 1943, and began after German troops and police entered the ghetto to deport its surviving inhabitants. It ended when the poorly-armed and supplied resistance was crushed by German troops."

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

This absolute babe is Jan Karski, a prominent member of the Polish resistance during the Second World War. Not just satisfied with sabotaging or harassing the local occupiers like lesser mortals after escaping the Russians and Germans as a prisoner of war, Karski got in touch with the exiled Polish government to report for duty. During the first four years of the war, he embarked on terrifyingly badass missions to provide the Allies with information about life in occupied Poland, more importantly about the Nazi extermination of Jews in his country. Undeterred by the Gestapo breaking every bone in his lovely face, Karski dedicated his career as a Resistance fighter to making the Holocaust public even before the war ended. Though not Jewish himself, he smuggled himself into the Warsaw Ghetto twice and the Belzec extermination camp to gather information, which he then snuck out of the country and brought to Allied government officials as far as Roosevelt in Washington DC.After reading his 1944 autobiography Story of a Secret State, I discovered that my new history crush was, coincidentally, my mum’s Theory of Communism lecturer at Georgetown, where he taught for about forty years after the war. In her words, ‘He was a god’ and had ‘intense blue eyes’ (weird inherited history crush? I think so). Even Obama has the hots for Jan Karski - he’s awarding him a posthumous Presidential Medal of Honour in a few weeks. Can you blame him? Check those cheekbones.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

This absolute babe is Jan Karski, a prominent member of the Polish resistance during the Second World War.

Not just satisfied with sabotaging or harassing the local occupiers like lesser mortals after escaping the Russians and Germans as a prisoner of war, Karski got in touch with the exiled Polish government to report for duty. During the first four years of the war, he embarked on terrifyingly badass missions to provide the Allies with information about life in occupied Poland, more importantly about the Nazi extermination of Jews in his country. Undeterred by the Gestapo breaking every bone in his lovely face, Karski dedicated his career as a Resistance fighter to making the Holocaust public even before the war ended. Though not Jewish himself, he smuggled himself into the Warsaw Ghetto twice and the Belzec extermination camp to gather information, which he then snuck out of the country and brought to Allied government officials as far as Roosevelt in Washington DC.

After reading his 1944 autobiography Story of a Secret State, I discovered that my new history crush was, coincidentally, my mum’s Theory of Communism lecturer at Georgetown, where he taught for about forty years after the war. In her words, ‘He was a god’ and had ‘intense blue eyes’ (weird inherited history crush? I think so). Even Obama has the hots for Jan Karski - he’s awarding him a posthumous Presidential Medal of Honour in a few weeks. Can you blame him? Check those cheekbones.

(via gottingen-deactivated20140225)

Its a funny time to say this, but… I wish I knew you better.

This fucking film. I’m not even going to bother saying The Pianist is required viewing.

(via iago-rotten)

Musicianm survivors of a concentration camp performing at a meeting of Belchatow concentration camp survivors, 1946.

Musicianm survivors of a concentration camp performing at a meeting of Belchatow concentration camp survivors, 1946.

Propaganda poster by Marek Żuławski celebrating the Polish contribution to the war effort, 1942.

Propaganda poster by Marek Żuławski celebrating the Polish contribution to the war effort, 1942.

Soldiers of the Polish Home Army surrending to German Wehrmacht at the checkpoint in Warsaw, 5th of October 1944 - the end of the Warsaw Uprising.

Soldiers of the Polish Home Army surrending to German Wehrmacht at the checkpoint in Warsaw, 5th of October 1944 - the end of the Warsaw Uprising.

Polish Civilians murdered by German SS forces (Oscar Dirlewanger) in the Warsaw Uprising, August 1944. Captured from a film by insurgent documentation cell.

Polish Civilians murdered by German SS forces (Oscar Dirlewanger) in the Warsaw Uprising, August 1944. Captured from a film by insurgent documentation cell.

A Warsaw Uprising insurgent from Mokotów district, is coming out of sewers and surrendering to Germans, 27 September 1944.

A Warsaw Uprising insurgent from Mokotów district, is coming out of sewers and surrendering to Germans, 27 September 1944.