Canadian soldiers sleeping and writing letters home in a trench near Willerval, Vichy Ridge sector, April 1918.
"Soldiers, interestingly, appear to have been concerned that the home front might crack. Consequently, propaganda flowed in two directions. Not only did the home front - the press in its editorials, clergymen in their sermons, teachers in their lessons, for instance - paint a rosy picture of the war; soldiers were inclined to hide the gruesome reality of the war from their loved ones at home. The military censor encouraged this; also, the language and metaphors appropriate to describe the unexpected new experience were lacking; and there was a desire to spare loved ones the concern and anguish. It seems clear that as the war progressed the spirit on the home front became much poorer than that of the fighting front."
-Modris Eksteins, Rites of Spring: The Great War and the Birth of the Modern Age.

Canadian soldiers sleeping and writing letters home in a trench near Willerval, Vichy Ridge sector, April 1918.

"Soldiers, interestingly, appear to have been concerned that the home front might crack. Consequently, propaganda flowed in two directions. Not only did the home front - the press in its editorials, clergymen in their sermons, teachers in their lessons, for instance - paint a rosy picture of the war; soldiers were inclined to hide the gruesome reality of the war from their loved ones at home. The military censor encouraged this; also, the language and metaphors appropriate to describe the unexpected new experience were lacking; and there was a desire to spare loved ones the concern and anguish. It seems clear that as the war progressed the spirit on the home front became much poorer than that of the fighting front."

-Modris Eksteins, Rites of Spring: The Great War and the Birth of the Modern Age.