gdfalksen:

If WWI was a Rap Battle…

Tags: i can't

1914-1945:

Horrible Histories - RAF Song

eggplantlit:

carnivaloftherandom:

mresundance:

reckonedrightly:

indypendenthistory:

On Sep 13, 1944, a princess from India lay dead at Dachau concentration camp. She had been tortured by the Nazis, then shot in the head. Her name was Noor Inayat Khan. The Germans knew her only as Nora Baker, a British spy who had gone into occupied France using the code name Madeline. She carried her transmitter from safe house to safe house with the Gestapo trailing her, providing communications for her Resistance unit.

Oh my God, yes. Let’s talk about Noor Inayat Khan.
Wireless operators in France had a life expectancy of six weeks. Noor was actively transmitting for over three times as long.
While she was in France, every other wireless operator in her network was slowly picked off until she was the last radio link between London and Paris. It was “the most dangerous and important post in France”.  
She was offered a way back to Britain and refused.
In fact, in her transmissions to London, she once said that she was having the time of her life, and thanked them for giving her the opportunity to do this.
She was captured by the Gestapo, but never gave up: she made three attempt escapes. One involved asking to take a bath, insisting on being allowed to close the door to preserve her modesty, and then clambering onto the roof of the Gestapo HQ in Paris.
Her last word before being shot was, “Liberté!”

The term BAMF was coined for such persons. 

Her entire life, and her mother’s life as well, are FASCINATING. A Royal, Muslim, Anglo-Indian woman in WWII… Could we have a sweeping FACTUAL movie please. Like now?

Yet another story I would like to read.

eggplantlit:

carnivaloftherandom:

mresundance:

reckonedrightly:

indypendenthistory:

On Sep 13, 1944, a princess from India lay dead at Dachau concentration camp. She had been tortured by the Nazis, then shot in the head. Her name was Noor Inayat Khan. The Germans knew her only as Nora Baker, a British spy who had gone into occupied France using the code name Madeline. She carried her transmitter from safe house to safe house with the Gestapo trailing her, providing communications for her Resistance unit.

Oh my God, yes. Let’s talk about Noor Inayat Khan.

  • Wireless operators in France had a life expectancy of six weeks. Noor was actively transmitting for over three times as long.
  • While she was in France, every other wireless operator in her network was slowly picked off until she was the last radio link between London and Paris. It was “the most dangerous and important post in France”.  
  • She was offered a way back to Britain and refused.
  • In fact, in her transmissions to London, she once said that she was having the time of her life, and thanked them for giving her the opportunity to do this.
  • She was captured by the Gestapo, but never gave up: she made three attempt escapes. One involved asking to take a bath, insisting on being allowed to close the door to preserve her modesty, and then clambering onto the roof of the Gestapo HQ in Paris.
  • Her last word before being shot was, “Liberté!”

The term BAMF was coined for such persons. 

Her entire life, and her mother’s life as well, are FASCINATING. A Royal, Muslim, Anglo-Indian woman in WWII… Could we have a sweeping FACTUAL movie please. Like now?

Yet another story I would like to read.

(via artifuss)

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Wiesław Chrzanowski (20 Dec 1923 – 29 Apr 2012), of the Polish Home Army’s “Anna” Company of the “Gustaw” Battalion, photographed on the balcony of a townhouse in September 1944- and he somehow still managed to look hella handsome even in the midst of the Warsaw Uprising.
He was a part of not one, but two movements of immense historical importance in Poland:  During World War II he was a member of the Polish anti-Nazi resistance organization, the Home Army and he fought in the infamous Warsaw Uprising. He finished a law degree at a secret underground university in 1945. Later on in his life, during the second half of the 1970s, he became associated with the opposition to the Soviet communist government in Poland. He helped to draft the statues establishing the Solidarity trade union (Solidarity was a big fucking deal, man) and he was the lawyer which guided the legal registration process of the organization. So all in all, definitely a worthy history crush <3

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Wiesław Chrzanowski (20 Dec 1923 – 29 Apr 2012), of the Polish Home Army’s “Anna” Company of the “Gustaw” Battalion, photographed on the balcony of a townhouse in September 1944- and he somehow still managed to look hella handsome even in the midst of the Warsaw Uprising.

He was a part of not one, but two movements of immense historical importance in Poland:  During World War II he was a member of the Polish anti-Nazi resistance organization, the Home Army and he fought in the infamous Warsaw Uprising. He finished a law degree at a secret underground university in 1945. Later on in his life, during the second half of the 1970s, he became associated with the opposition to the Soviet communist government in Poland. He helped to draft the statues establishing the Solidarity trade union (Solidarity was a big fucking deal, man) and he was the lawyer which guided the legal registration process of the organization. So all in all, definitely a worthy history crush <3

sydneyflapper:

alamaris:

  1. North African soldiers in Oise, France, 1917
  2. North African soldiers near the Western Front
  3. Indo-Chinese Sergeant
  4. Sikh and French soldiers in Pas-de-Calais, France, 1915
  5. Algerian soldiers in Oise, France, 1917
  6. Indian troops undergoing a gas mask drill
  7. Sengealese and other French colony soldiers
  8. Wounded Indian soldiers in France
  9. Provenance unknown
  10. Native American veterans of WWI

I’ve ranted about this before.  Popular books on WWI give one the impression that it was a war fought entirely (or at least predominantly) by white soldiers.  The reality is that more than a million colonial troops fought on all fronts of the war — and that’s not even counting the Native American and African American soldiers who came later, and the Turkish soldiers on the German side.

I’d include Maori and Indigenous Australians in this too…the latter had to face tremendous obstacles in order to sign up (restrictions were apparently relaxed somewhat towards the end)…indeed, although not even counted as Australian citizens at the time, some traveled great distances to recruiting stations in order to try and sign up, only to be rejected. Still, some managed to overcome this - in some instances by claiming to be Maori or Indian.

And here’s one of our WWI legends: Billy Sing, who had an astonishing record as a sniper at Gallipoli:

Sing’s father was ethnically Chinese (there has been recent controversy over an attempt to film a biopic that cast both Sing and his father as white Europeans - fortunately the uproar was such that the project was dropped, although I’d like to see an accurately cast version of the story).

WW1 was a war that, like most, should never have happened…but in remembering it, I do like to recall that the ANZAC that my grandfather belonged to, and fought in from Gallipoli to the end, was not entirely comprised of white Australians.

Tags: history WWI ww1

lostsplendor:

"Glamor of the Allies": French Postcard Set c. 1917 via Tuckdb

Give me the strength not to go write essays about these immediately.

For those who were asking about the Wild Boys - an interesting article.

Before World War II, 669 children who were destined for Nazi death camps were rescued and transported to England by Sir Nicholas Winton. Years later, they came together for a touching surprise tribute to their hero.

charliecrack said: When I first bookmarked this page which I think is fantastic there was an article about groups of "wild" boys living outside Berlin after the War can you please post that story again?Thanks

Post 1 and post 2.

Postcards by D. Tempest, c. 1916-18

(Source: actionbird, via meiringens)